Category Archives: LBEG Seminars

A great year, thanks to all LBEG speakers!

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It has been a wonderful academic year for LBEG, with many great events and initiatives.
Many thanks to all the speakers who have accepted to contribute to the LBEG events this academic year: thank you to Orazio Attanasio (UCL), Daniel Berry (NHS England), Tim Chadborn (Public Health England), Gary Charness (UCSB), Stefan Dercon (Oxford, DFID), Antonio Guarino(UCL), Bjorn Hartig (Royal Holloway University of London), Benedikt Herrmann (University of Nottingham, European Commission), Peter John (UCL), George Loewenstein (Carnegie Mellon University), Aniol Llorente-Saguer (Queen Mary University London), Alison Mclean (Swiss Re), Michael Naef (Royal Holloway University London), Rosemarie Nagel (Universitat Pompeu Fabra), Giovanni Ponti (University of Alicante, LUISS), Matthias Sutter (University of Cologne, University of Innsbruck), Eyal Winter (Hebrew University of Jerusalem, University of Leicester), and Daniel Zizzo (University of Newcastle).
See you after the summer for a new LBEG academic year!

LBEG Seminar Wednesday 18 May: Matthias Sutter & Antonio Guarino

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The last London Behavioural and Experimental Group seminar of the academic year took place on Wednesday 18 May 2016, 5-7pm, at London School of Economics, Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, 54 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, WC2A 3LJ.

It was a very successful event with two wonderful speakers.

The invited speaker was Prof. Matthias Sutter (University of Cologne, University of Innsbruck) who talked about ‘Where to look for the morals in markets?’.

The London speaker was Prof. Antonio Guarino (UCL) who talked about ‘Updating ambiguous beliefs in a social learning experiment’.

Both talks were beautifully inspiring and engaging.
Matthias and Antonio presented two lab experiments that nicely combined theory, experimental design, and econometric analysis, two further brilliant demonstrations that theory, experiments, and econometrics are complementary, not substitute, tools for behavioural economists.

Thank you very much to Antonio and Matthias for such a ‘peak end effect’ for this LBEG academic year!

Thanks to everybody who has contributed to the LBEG initiatives this year and see you after the summer!

LBEG18may2016c

LBEG Seminar Tuesday 26 April 2016: Gary Charness & Peter John

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Another great London Behavioural and Experimental Group seminar took place on Tuesday 26 April 2016, 5-7pm, at London School of Economics, Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, 54 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, WC2A 3LJ.

The invited speaker was Prof. Gary Charness (UCSB) with a talk on ‘Communication and (non-)equilibrium selection’.

The London speaker was Prof. Peter John (UCL) with a talk on ‘Nudges that promote channel shift: a randomized evaluation of reminders for disability badges’.

And a very nice evening together at a Thai restaurant!
Charness

Fourth LBEG seminar with Prof. Colin Camerer and Prof. Antonio Cabrales

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goldsmith

On Tuesday 3rd March 2015 (5.30-7.30pm), we had an exciting and very well-attended Fourth LBEG seminar, this time at the LSE (Graham Wallace Room, 5th Floor, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE). It was really a great privilege and pleasure to have the opportunity to interact with two leading experimental and behavioural researchers. The guest speaker was Prof. Colin Camerer (Caltech), who gave a talk on “Neuroeconomics of experimental stock price bubbles”.
The London speaker was Prof. Antonio Cabrales (UCL) who gave a talk on “Can there be a market for cheap-talk information? Some experimental evidence”.
The seminar room was literally packed of people, and it was good to see so many experimental and behavioural colleagues coming together from all around London to listen to the two amazing talks.
As usual, we then went for dinner with the two speakers (nice modern Korean food this time…). Thank you very much to Antonio and Colin for making it an impressive LBEG event!

Third LBEG Seminar on 29th January 2015 with Prof. Daniel J Zizzo and Prof. Pablo Brañas-Garza

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On Thursday 29th January 2015 (5-7pm), we will have the Third LBEG seminar, at Senate House Library, Malet Street, WC1E 7HU, Seng Teng Lee Centre.
We are delighted to have the opportunity to meet Prof. Daniel J Zizzo (University of Newcastle), who will give a talk on “Competence versus trustworthiness: what do voters care about?”.
The London behavioural and experimental speaker will be Prof. Pablo Brañas-Garza (Middlesex University) who will give a talk on “Ethnic polarization, gender roles, and punishment in Public Good Games”.
As usual, we will then go for drinks and dinner with the two speakers. Looking forward to it!

First LBEG Brown Bag Workshop at KCL

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On 4th December 2014, 5-7pm, we had the first LBEG work-in-progress seminar, hosted at King’s College London, Strand Campus, and organised by Dr Elisa Cavatorta (KCL).
The idea is to have regular occasions, once per term, where members of our group can present early stage experimental work in order to receive feedback and suggestions prior to finalize design, analysis, or writing. As such, the work-in-progress seminars appeal to not yet polished projects which are usually presented at external seminars or conferences.
They are also perfect occasions for sharing ideas and different perspectives in an informal environment, and to foster research collaborations among us.
Four projects were presented, each one given about 15 minutes for presentation, and 15 minutes for comments.
Dr Natalie Gold (KCL) discussed her project on “Friends and future selves: the relationship between choice over time and sociality”; Dr Jeroen Nieboer (LSE) talked on “Decisions under risk from experience in an insurance context”; Prof. Shaun Hargreaves-Heap (KCL) presented a project on “Conformism”; while Dr Ismael Rodriguez-Lara (Middlesex) discussed an experiment on “Coordinated punishment”.
The seminar was well attended and each project received thorough and very constructive comments and suggestions, in a collaborative and friendly atmosphere.
As usual, we then headed for dinner out all together, and spent a great evening talking in front of delicious Thai food (and wine…). Congratulations and many thanks to Elisa for having organised this other very successful event!

First London PhD Experimental Workshop at Middlesex

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On 1st December 2014, 10am-5pm, we had the first London PhD Experimental (LPEx) Workshop, funded by the ESRC, hosted at Middlesex University, and organised by Lara Ezquerra Guerra (Middlesex), Celia Blanco Jimenez (Royal Holloway), and Theodoros Alysandratos (Royal Holloway).
The idea is to have regular occasions where PhD students (and not just in London) can present their experimental research to receive feedback and suggestions, as well as to practice for conference presentations and job talks. The workshop is also a perfect occasion for sharing ideas in an informal and friendly environment, and to foster research collaborations among PhD students, and between PhD students and more experienced experimentalists.
The workshop hosted an invited talk by Jason Shachat (Durham) on “Discrete rule learning and the bidding of the sexes”. A total of 9 PhD projects were then presented, each one given about 30 minutes for presentation and comments.
Andreas Friedl (Institute for the World Economy in Kiel) discussed his project on “Social reference points and risk taking”; Liang Lu (UEA) talked about “The effect of endogenous fines and detection probabilities on cartel formation and price”; Lara Ezquerra Guerra (Middlesex) presented “Sizes and resources limitations within teams”; XiaoYu Zhou (Royal Holloway) discussed “Does testosterone promote status seeking behaviour?”; Georgia Michailidou (Nottingham) talked about “Distributive justice and relative economic status: experimental evidence from Athens”; Daniel Derbyshire (Birmingham) presented his project “Sequential equilibrium and moral hazard auctions”; Carsten Crede (UEA) discussed “Transition from explicit to tacit collusion and the bias in cartel damage estimates”; Markus Dertwinkel-Kalt (Dusseldorf) talked about “Exchange asymmetries for bads? Experimental evidence”; and finally, Zhara Murad (Surrey) presented “Multitasking incentives in gift exchange settings”.
The seminar was very well attended, also by more experienced experimentalists from many London universities, and each project received thorough and very constructive comments and suggestions, all in a collaborative and helpful atmosphere.
As usual in our group, we ended up in having informal discussions over drinks and eventually dinner. Congratulations and many thanks to Lara, Celia, and Theo for having organised this other highly successful event!

Second LBEG seminar with Prof. Graham Loomes and Prof. Nick Vriend

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On Thursday 13th November 2014 (5-7pm), we had a very interesting and well-attended Second LBEG seminar, at Senate House Library (Malet Street, WC1E 7HU, Seng Teng Lee Centre).
It was really a great pleasure and privilege to have the opportunity to meet Prof. Graham Loomes (Warwick Business School), who gave a talk on “Looking for ‘attitudes to ambiguity’ in a strategic setting”.
The London behavioural and experimental speaker was Prof. Nick Vriend (QMUL) who gave a talk on “Social identity and punishment in a minimum effort game”.
As usual, we then went for drinks and dinner with the two speakers (nice Greek food this time…). Thank you very much to Graham and Nick for making it another successful LBEG event!

Peter Wakker/Shaun Hargreaves Heap seminar

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Yesterday was the first LBEG seminar at the Senate House – thanks for all who attended and made it a success. The talks from Peter Wakker and Shaun Hargreaves Heap were very well received and there was lots of debate, both before and after the seminar. It was very fitting that the talks – one on individual decision-making and the other on pro-sociality – covered both “sides of behavioural economics”, as Prof. Hargreaves Heap remarked in his talk.

We were pleased to see that the seminar attracted many young researchers from various London universities – a sign that behavioural and experimental economics is a field with an exciting future in London. We look forward to seeing you again at the next seminar with Graham Loomes as our external speaker.

The paper that Prof. Wakker presented in his talk can be found here.